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Round Earth Media

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Round Earth Media has supported dozens of journalists who have written hundreds of pieces covering numerous topics in diverse countries. To explore all these stories, visit our archives!

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From South Africa

December 7, 2018

Our Amazing Young Journalists

From South Africa via Web Conference

That’s me, very early one morning this week (and a little sleep deprived), connecting with our team in South Africa.  Saam Jalinous is shown here, a student at Wesleyan.  In the audience — our other American journalism students and two of South Africa’s most acclaimed professional journalists (the students’ Round Earth mentors), Martine Barker and Jonathan Ancer.  The students presented their feature stories — and their experiences reporting them —

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Quiet, Untidy Corners

October 19, 2018

As tempting as it is for Americans to focus attention inward as American democracy feels like it is imploding, it is vital to remember that the United States is still a power that reaches into lives, and sometimes deals death, around the world. If Chinua Achebe’s famously wise words were right, if evil really does thrive best in “quiet, untidy corners,” then foreign correspondents must persevere there.

That’s Christina Goldbaum, a 2014 college graduate and a new reporter with The New York Times. 

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Greetings from India

March 2, 2018

Hello everyone,

Greetings from India where I am vacationing (OK, also working) for a few weeks and just now got strong enough Internet to send this weekly newsletter.   Next stop: Morocco where I’ll be helping our students prepare their story ideas.

As many of you know, our unique method means stories have two reporters: one from the United States and the other from the country where the story happens.  Our student partners are no exception. These young reporters, with mentoring from Round Earth’s experienced editors,

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Glimpse Life in South Africa

December 8, 2017


From university protests against tuition costs to the popularity of indigenous plants instead of water intensive lawns, reporting from students on our study abroad journalism program in South Africa provides an amazing glimpse into life in this fascinating country.  Here’s a sample of our stories as they reached huge audiences in the South Africa. Happy reading and look for the students’ major feature stories in US outlets coming soon.

Capetown Residents Digging Up their Lawns

Protesting UCT Students Won’t Back Down

One Man’s Trash is Another Man’s Treasure

That Parking Lot was my Home

Give Time not Money to Charity

Lucrative Deals Flooding into the Western Cape

Funeral Parlors Operate Illegally

Sex Education Video Targets Teens

What Bird Flu has to do with the Price of Eggs

Police Net Abalone Smugglers

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Greetings from the Sahara

October 27, 2017

Hello to my friends and the friends of Round Earth:

Quick message this week. I just landed in Morocco, and am now in the Sahara on my way to meet with students on our program here.

It’s always so rewarding to work with these enthusiastic young American journalists and their Moroccan partners.  More from me next week!

With warm regards,
Mary

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We’re Off and Running!

September 15, 2017

Students just arrived in Morocco & South Africa

What a program! From our very first semester in Morocco (more than 5 years ago), with this story in the New York Times.  To last semester’s reporting for public radio stations nationwide (PRi’s The World).

 

And from South Africa, a great start to the second semester of our new journalism track on a program about political transformation in this fascinating,

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“It can only get worse.”

July 7, 2017

M’HAMID EL GHIZLANE, Morocco — For generations, they were known as “rain nomads,” herders who moved constantly along the western rim of the Sahara Desert in search of a patch of green where their goats and camels could graze.

Then the rain, never plentiful, became even more sporadic. Temperatures got hotter. A dam choked another source of precious water, the Draa River. Not even the camels could endure.

Families whose lives revolved around the seasons and the needs of their livestock,

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Study: Media slants coverage of Muslim women

May 12, 2017

New Study:
Media slants coverage of Muslim women

This is the conclusion from Rochelle Terman, a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford who conducted a study of New York Times and Washington Post coverage between 1980 and 2014.

Here’s Terman:

Are Muslims inherently misogynist? Many Americans seem to think so.  Public opinion data reveal anxiety about whether Islam is compatible with Western values. A big part of that unease comes from the perception that Muslim societies are sexist and patriarchal….American public opinion about Muslim women’s rights may come in part from an imbalance in media portrayals….U.S.

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Yes, They Can!

April 7, 2017

Student Journalist Emily Rizzo (right) with Ahmed Kathrada and Barbara Hogan

It’s been 5 years since SIT Study Abroad approached me with the idea of starting a journalism program in Morocco.   I agreed — under two conditions.  We use the Round Earth partnership model (an American journalism student partnered with a young journalist from the country). And, we publish the stories in top media outlets–  if they’re good enough.  To their eternal credit, SIT said “Why not?”  But others weren’t so sure. 

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What Path is Best?

July 9, 2016

Is Bigger the Best Path
to Development?

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TANGIER, Morocco — At cafés on Tangier’s Mediterranean coast, rows of young Moroccans sit facing the hazy, yet ever present outline of Spain a mere 8.5 miles away. The idea of escaping to Spain is deep-set in Tangier. Stories often surface of overnight boats transporting Moroccan migrants. Some even attempt to swim the distance and drown. Driving this exodus is unemployment in Morocco which stands at close to 40 percent,

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