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Round Earth Media

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Round Earth Media has supported dozens of journalists who have written hundreds of pieces covering numerous topics in diverse countries. To explore all these stories, visit our archives!

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Together Again

September 28, 2018

As you know, Round Earth Media is based on the idea that the best international journalism is created in partnership. An American and a journalist from the country where the story is taking place, working together in equal partnership, their important, under-reported stories reaching audiences in both countries.

Guia Baggi and Zanna McKay joined up as reporting partners for Round Earth in Italy in 2013. The first story they covered was for PRI’s The World and Wired.it about an Italian rapper who brought the struggles of unemployed Italian youths to the fore.

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Yes, they can!

August 24, 2018

 

It started in April 2012, with this story by a student reporter and photographer, published in The New York Times.   Since then, students in Morocco have been responsible for some of the most important — and consistent — reporting from this neglected region.  Proof positive that journalism students can produce international reporting at the highest levels of the profession.  

Students arrive soon for the fall semester on our journalism programs in Morocco andSouth Africa

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From Aida

August 17, 2018

I’m taking a break this week and turning the newsletter over to one of Round Earth’s most brilliant young journalists.   Aida Alami returned recently from a Round Earth reporting project in Haiti (photo is of Aida at the rear of the motorbike with her Haitian and Dominican colleagues). Here’s Aida writing from her home in Morocco:

After spending a few years in New York City where I studied journalism, I moved back to Morocco in late 2009, only a few months before major political changes known today as the Arab Spring.

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Harassed

August 3, 2018

From the experience of Round Earth’s female journalists to the stories we report, harassment based on gender is front and center these days.

Courageous female journalists are coming forward to reveal “The Cost of Reporting While Female,” as an article in the Columbia Journalism Review (CJR) put it.  (The article includes a fascinating timeline, starting in 1829, documenting the harassment of female journalists.)

At Round Earth, we support female journalists through shared experience, understanding and partnership.  My colleague Elisa Lees Muñoz,

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Now More Than Ever

June 22, 2018

A Special Message from
Mary Stucky

We’re half way through the best year ever at Round Earth!  For those of you who support us every year, THANK YOU, and a very special request.

Might you be able to make your annual gift to Round Earth this month or next?  

Donations of any amount mean so much right now as we are about to embark on some important new projects.  Credit card donations are great,

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Greetings from India

March 2, 2018

Hello everyone,

Greetings from India where I am vacationing (OK, also working) for a few weeks and just now got strong enough Internet to send this weekly newsletter.   Next stop: Morocco where I’ll be helping our students prepare their story ideas.

As many of you know, our unique method means stories have two reporters: one from the United States and the other from the country where the story happens.  Our student partners are no exception. These young reporters, with mentoring from Round Earth’s experienced editors,

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Dark Days

February 2, 2018

With light from Round Earth

The International Reporting Project just shut down. For 20 years IRP was a premier independent non-profit funding international journalism. 651 IRP-funded journalists have reported from 115 countries, producing important, under-covered stories mostly from the developing world.  No official reason was given for the decision but it’s reported that IRP was out of money.  The community of international journalists — mostly freelancers these days — is devastated by this loss with many journalists saying IRP is where they were able to get funding for some of their most important work.

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Glimpse Life in South Africa

December 8, 2017


From university protests against tuition costs to the popularity of indigenous plants instead of water intensive lawns, reporting from students on our study abroad journalism program in South Africa provides an amazing glimpse into life in this fascinating country.  Here’s a sample of our stories as they reached huge audiences in the South Africa. Happy reading and look for the students’ major feature stories in US outlets coming soon.

Capetown Residents Digging Up their Lawns

Protesting UCT Students Won’t Back Down

One Man’s Trash is Another Man’s Treasure

That Parking Lot was my Home

Give Time not Money to Charity

Lucrative Deals Flooding into the Western Cape

Funeral Parlors Operate Illegally

Sex Education Video Targets Teens

What Bird Flu has to do with the Price of Eggs

Police Net Abalone Smugglers

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Projects with Legs

December 1, 2017


When we partnered Francisco Rodriguez (left) and Giovanna Dell’Orto  (center) on our Migration Reporting Project in Guatemala a few years ago,  it was only the beginning.

Francisco and Giovanna have kept in touch and, earlier this month, Giovanna hosted a conference in Minneapolis (flyer), which brought together journalists covering refugees and migration from all over the world. Of course, she invited Francisco, which gave me the chance to finally meet him in person.  We reflected upon the way in which our project changed his thinking about journalism.

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Dream Teams

November 3, 2017

Greetings from Rabat, Morocco where I am with 15 eager American students and Aida Alami (photo), a contributor to the New York Times (Aida is also on Round Earth’s Advisory Board). We’re here this week helping the students polish their pitches before they and their Moroccan partners embark on 5 weeks of field reporting.

In the field now, as part of our reporting project in Haiti,are Michel Joseph,

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