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Round Earth Media has supported dozens of journalists who have written hundreds of pieces covering numerous topics in diverse countries. To explore all these stories, visit our archives!

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Glimpse Life in South Africa

December 8, 2017


From university protests against tuition costs to the popularity of indigenous plants instead of water intensive lawns, reporting from students on our study abroad journalism program in South Africa provides an amazing glimpse into life in this fascinating country.  Here’s a sample of our stories as they reached huge audiences in the South Africa. Happy reading and look for the students’ major feature stories in US outlets coming soon.

Capetown Residents Digging Up their Lawns

Protesting UCT Students Won’t Back Down

One Man’s Trash is Another Man’s Treasure

That Parking Lot was my Home

Give Time not Money to Charity

Lucrative Deals Flooding into the Western Cape

Funeral Parlors Operate Illegally

Sex Education Video Targets Teens

What Bird Flu has to do with the Price of Eggs

Police Net Abalone Smugglers

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Projects with Legs

December 1, 2017


When we partnered Francisco Rodriguez (left) and Giovanna Dell’Orto  (center) on our Migration Reporting Project in Guatemala a few years ago,  it was only the beginning.

Francisco and Giovanna have kept in touch and, earlier this month, Giovanna hosted a conference in Minneapolis (flyer), which brought together journalists covering refugees and migration from all over the world. Of course, she invited Francisco, which gave me the chance to finally meet him in person.  We reflected upon the way in which our project changed his thinking about journalism.

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We’re on the ground in Haiti

October 20, 2017

Journalists Amy Bracken (American) and Michel Joseph (Haitian), along with Haitian photographer, Edine Celestin, started work together this week, the first team reporting for Round Earth Media’s project on inequality in Haiti.

Reeling from natural disasters, bitterly divided over politics and still struggling with a colonial past, Haiti appears to be trapped in a self-destructive spiral. Out of the limelight, however, people work to rebuild their lives with ingenuity and a dogged refusal to be left behind.

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Competition or Collaboration?

October 6, 2017

As a young reporter, I was attracted to work in  Minneapolis-St Paul by the intense competition between two award-winning daily newspapers and renowned TV newsrooms.  That competition produced great journalism and an unusually well-informed citizenry.  (That’s a very young Mary Stucky on deadline, checking the clock at the 1984 Democratic National Convention.)

Throughout the country, great American news outlets thrived for decades in productive competition until the Internet disrupted the advertising and subscription model that had long supported journalism.   Since then, more and more news organizations have embraced collaboration.

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What is happening?

September 15, 2017


In just the past month

Hurricane Harvey inundated Houston
Hurricane Irma slammed into Florida and the Southeastern US
Hurricane Maria pummeled the Caribbean still reeling from Irma
Two earthquakes devastated Mexico
Hurricane Jose still threatens parts of the US

The news is heartbreaking.  Before the advent of the internet and the 24/7 news cycle we didn’t have as much instantaneous news about disasters like these. While we might prefer not know, I don’t think that’s an option.

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We’re Off and Running!

Students just arrived in Morocco & South Africa

What a program! From our very first semester in Morocco (more than 5 years ago), with this story in the New York Times.  To last semester’s reporting for public radio stations nationwide (PRi’s The World).

 

And from South Africa, a great start to the second semester of our new journalism track on a program about political transformation in this fascinating,

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Done with Journalism?

September 8, 2017

Lately, I’m hearing — even from my news junkie friends — that they’re done with journalism.  Tired of reading bad news.  Tired of the shouting.  Tired of news stories that are thin and unsatisfying.  Just tired.

I share these feelings. And yet, I spend almost every day working to produce journalism.  Working with dedicated, ethical, sincere early-career and veteran journalists.

I still have hope for my profession.

The words of John Foley, Executive Director of the California Academy of Sciences,

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“It can only get worse.”

July 7, 2017

M’HAMID EL GHIZLANE, Morocco — For generations, they were known as “rain nomads,” herders who moved constantly along the western rim of the Sahara Desert in search of a patch of green where their goats and camels could graze.

Then the rain, never plentiful, became even more sporadic. Temperatures got hotter. A dam choked another source of precious water, the Draa River. Not even the camels could endure.

Families whose lives revolved around the seasons and the needs of their livestock,

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Consider the 1st Amendment

June 30, 2017

Consider the First Amendment

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

As the 4th of July approaches, I plan to reflect on the importance and wisdom of the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.  And the way in which independent journalism champions this fundamental right.

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Trust

May 26, 2017


Hello everyone,I’m just back from “Elevate Engagement,” a conference sponsored by the non-profit Journalism That Matters and the Agora Journalism Center at the University of Oregon’s School of Journalism and Communication.  What’s one take-home from this conference?  A new understanding about the pervasive lack of trust in journalists.

There are many reasons for this. We journalists have missed essential stories and failed to cover our communities — domestic and global — fairly and adequately. We’ve failed to investigate. To challenge.  And importantly, to shine a light on the good in the world,

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