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Round Earth Media

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Round Earth Media has supported dozens of journalists who have written hundreds of pieces covering numerous topics in diverse countries. To explore all these stories, visit our archives!

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Visiting Vietnam? Go soon!

March 11, 2017

It’s architectural gems are disappearing

HO CHI MINH CITY   Once an architectural gem emblematic of Vietnam’s era as a French colony, the Tax Trade Center with its iconic Art Deco facade is now mostly rubble.

Despite a petition drive spearheaded by a growing historic preservation movement, the building was demolished in recent months. In its place, developers plan a 43-story complex with a connection to the first subway line in the city.

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What Path is Best?

July 9, 2016

Is Bigger the Best Path
to Development?

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TANGIER, Morocco — At cafés on Tangier’s Mediterranean coast, rows of young Moroccans sit facing the hazy, yet ever present outline of Spain a mere 8.5 miles away. The idea of escaping to Spain is deep-set in Tangier. Stories often surface of overnight boats transporting Moroccan migrants. Some even attempt to swim the distance and drown. Driving this exodus is unemployment in Morocco which stands at close to 40 percent,

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A film you won’t want to miss!

April 15, 2016

Twin Cities friends:
A film you won’t want to miss!
By 2050, the world population is expected to grow to ten billion people.

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As part of the Minneapolis St Paul International Film Festival, Round Earth Media,  along with Common Harvest Farm and GYST Fermentation Bar, is sponsoring this timely documentary which confronts the important choices we make every day about the food we eat—where it comes from,

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Cuba Organics: Moringa anyone?

March 18, 2016

Round Earth Media Exclusive
Cuba, Organics and US Farmers

When third-generation farmer Rick Roth envisions the possible end of the long U.S. trade embargo on Cuba, just across the Florida straits, he sees potential competition. And he worries about diseases, pests and invasive species.

While many U.S. agricultural producers and businesses are eager to start exporting to Cuba, Florida farmers say the Obama administration’s plan to allow Cuban imports threatens their $8 billion a year business.

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Powerful Journalism From Morocco

November 18, 2014

Our latest

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Reporting Morocco students on PRI's Living on Earth

October 31, 2014

Fascinating, Toxic Moroccan Tanneries

This story originally appeared on PRI’s Living on Earth, listen HERE.

by Amulya Shankar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Gold Mining in Ghana: Playing with Mercury

November 8, 2013

NESTLED in a former cocoa-farming region in southwestern Ghana, the town of Prestea boasts more than 150 small-scale gold mines in the backyards of abandoned farms. The town, with a population of about 35,000, also sits covered in permanent smog—a red dust that stains white goats crimson. It is the result of lethal mercury, on which miners all over Ghana rely to refine their gold. In Prestea, where gravediggers are in greater supply than doctors, death from mercury poisoning is routine.

Thus begins Maddy Crowell’s powerful story in the Economist Magazine

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What Makes Countries Rich or Poor?

July 10, 2012

Here’s Round Earth Media intern Emma Foehringer Merchant with more about why some nations fail and others succeed.
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It is blatantly obvious that certain states have had some sort of leg up in becoming world powers. Just what offered these countries their advantage? Daron Acemoglu and James A. Robinson explain in their book Why Nations Fail: The Origins of Power, Prosperity, and Poverty, reviewed by Jared Diamond (author of the best-selling Guns, Germs and Steel) in last month’s New York Review of Books.

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Bolivian President Caught in the Middle

June 18, 2012

Listen to this story

The following is a transcript. To listen to this broadcast, please click the link above.

Bruce Gellerman: It’s Living on Earth, I’m Bruce Gellerman.

[SOUNDS OF PROTESTS IN BOLIVIA]

Gellerman: In Bolivia, the people spoke and the government listened. For three months, a thousand people marched across the Andes Mountains, closing roads, enduring police crackdown and arrest. They were protesting the government’s plan to build a highway through indigenous lands and Amazon forest.

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Our Central America Project

July 7, 2010

Gold mining in El Salvador: Pacific Rim verdict expected in August 2010

As we get closer to our trip to Central America, we will be blogging about some of the most important issues facing the region. One of the most contentious issues facing the country of El Salvador is gold mining. Is it an economic boon or an environmental disaster? From journalist Ambar Espinoza, the latest on the case involving the so-called Pacific Rim mine.

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