Round Earth Media

I was heartbroken….

May 11, 2018

“I was heartbroken, and I was scared, and I had no idea if I was doing the right thing.”  ~Ronan Farrow


And yet, despite the threats, the doubts, and the lack of support, Farrow kept reporting the story that earned him a shared Pulitzer Prize, exposing allegations of sexual assault by movie mogul Harvey Weinstein.  In an emotional speech to the graduating class at Loyola Marymount University, Farrow revealed the doubts that plagued him — and that often plague us journalists, exacting such a heavy toll. Here’s Farrow:

In hindsight, it’s always clear whether or not your choices were the right ones….But, in the moment, you don’t know how important a story is going to be.

There was a moment about a year ago when I didn’t have the institutional support of my news organization. My contract was ending. And after I refused to stop work on the story, I did not have a new one. My book publisher dropped me, refusing to look at a single page of a manuscript I’d labored over for years. I found out another news outlet was racing to scoop me on the Weinstein story, and I knew I was falling behind. I did not know if I’d ever be able to report that story, or if a year of work would amount to anything. I did not know if I would let down woman after brave woman who had put their trust in me.

You will face a moment in your career where you have absolutely no idea what to do. Where it will be totally unclear to you what the right thing is for you, for your family, for your community. And I hope that in that moment you’ll be generous with yourself, but trust that inner voice. Because more than ever we need people to be guided by their own senses of principle—and not the whims of a culture that prizes ambition, and sensationalism, and celebrity, and vulgarity, and doing whatever it takes to win.

Ronan Farrow trusted his “inner voice” despite enormous personal risks.  Click on the image above to read Farrow’s powerful, inspiring message in its entirety.

With warmest regards,
Mary

And yet, despite the threats, the doubts, and the lack of support, Farrow kept reporting the story that earned him a shared Pulitzer Prize, exposing allegations of sexual assault by movie mogul Harvey Weinstein.  In an emotional speech to the graduating class at Loyola Marymount University, Farrow revealed the doubts that plagued him — and that often plague us journalists, exacting such a heavy toll. Here’s Farrow:

In hindsight, it’s always clear whether or not your choices were the right ones….But, in the moment, you don’t know how important a story is going to be.

There was a moment about a year ago when I didn’t have the institutional support of my news organization. My contract was ending. And after I refused to stop work on the story, I did not have a new one. My book publisher dropped me, refusing to look at a single page of a manuscript I’d labored over for years. I found out another news outlet was racing to scoop me on the Weinstein story, and I knew I was falling behind. I did not know if I’d ever be able to report that story, or if a year of work would amount to anything. I did not know if I would let down woman after brave woman who had put their trust in me.

You will face a moment in your career where you have absolutely no idea what to do. Where it will be totally unclear to you what the right thing is for you, for your family, for your community. And I hope that in that moment you’ll be generous with yourself, but trust that inner voice. Because more than ever we need people to be guided by their own senses of principle—and not the whims of a culture that prizes ambition, and sensationalism, and celebrity, and vulgarity, and doing whatever it takes to win.

Ronan Farrow trusted his “inner voice” despite enormous personal risks.  Click on the image above to read Farrow’s powerful, inspiring message in its entirety.

With warmest regards,
Mary

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