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Round Earth Media

A film you won’t want to miss!

April 15, 2016

Twin Cities friends:
A film you won’t want to miss!
By 2050, the world population is expected to grow to ten billion people.

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As part of the Minneapolis St Paul International Film Festival, Round Earth Media,  along with Common Harvest Farm and GYST Fermentation Bar, is sponsoring this timely documentary which confronts the important choices we make every day about the food we eat—where it comes from, how it’s made,

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Can you imagine?

April 8, 2016

A radio station in Chiapas, Mexico is holding a panel discussion about migration — in the Chol (Maya) language — after every episode of our radio series, Vidas Cruzadas. This is the power of Round Earth Media.

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Vidas Cruzadas is our 8 part Spanish language radio series running on stations in Mexico, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, and Costa Rica. It’s a groundbreaking accomplishment. Some of these radio stations don’t have Internet and the show is taken out to them by CD.

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Cuba Organics: Moringa anyone?

March 18, 2016

Round Earth Media Exclusive
Cuba, Organics and US Farmers

Willie Bonner, a staffer at Little Pond Farm in Bushnell, Fla., stocks organic vegetables at the Saturday Morning Market in downtown St. Petersburg, Fla. (Photo: Beth Reynolds, Round Earth Media)

Willie Bonner, a staffer at Little Pond Farm in Bushnell, Fla., stocks organic vegetables at the Saturday Morning Market in downtown St. Petersburg, Fla. (Photo: Beth Reynolds, Round Earth Media)

When third-generation farmer Rick Roth envisions the possible end of the long U.S. trade embargo on Cuba, just across the Florida straits, he sees potential competition. And he worries about diseases, pests and invasive species.

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New ground-breaking Spanish radio series

January 8, 2016

2016 is off to a great start at Round Earth Media!

We are hard at work on a ground-breaking series in Spanish for radio stations in Mexico and Central America — the countries so many immigrants are fleeing.

Only Round Earth can claim to reach audiences in the U.S. and in the countries where the stories are actually taking place.
Our eight-part radio series in Spanish builds on the Latin American tradition of using storytelling as part of educational radio programming and will resemble a telenovela with a cliffhanger ending every week.

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“Hey hey, ho ho, reporters have got to go!”

November 10, 2015

University of Missouri Professor telling a student journalist to leave a public space.“Hey hey, ho ho, reporters have got to go!”

That’s what protesters chanted yesterday at the University of Missouri, blocking journalists’ access to a public area of the campus during protests over racial issues.  Annie Rees is a graduate student at Missouri’s acclaimed school of journalism.  “I needed to write what I felt,” says Rees.  We share her reflections here. 

I know that journalists can be invasive. I am deeply aware that the media can perpetuate problems. And even personally, for me,

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You’ve seen the pictures

September 28, 2015

The little boy’s body washed up on the beach, the exhausted men and women, old and young, sleeping on the streets of European cities.  Millions of people around the world are on the move. They’re fleeing war, violence and desperate poverty.

And it’s not just Europe, Africa and the Middle East where this is happening.

On our southern border, every day, a human drama plays out, as Central Americans and Mexicans try desperately to cross into the US.

If you’ve ever wondered why people risk their lives – and their children’s lives –

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Cultural Collaboration: How Round Earth Media reporters get the story

September 12, 2015

Imelda&Devin1Devin and Imelda met in a hotel lobby in Phoenix, one of the few places offering a reprieve from the Arizona August. Apart from the assignment they shared, the Round Earth Media partners didn’t appear to have much in common. Imelda Robles was a print journalist; Devin Browne created stories for the radio. Browne hailed from laid back Los Angeles; Robles called Monterrey, Mexico home.

Their differences showed immediately. Browne was dressed for the triple digit temperatures, American-style—Robles was not.

“[Imelda] showed up in long jeans and high platform heels,

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Alicia Fernandez: Mexican journalist expanding perspectives, including her own

July 30, 2015

Alicia picAlicia Fernández sits in her car, parked somewhere between the two points that anchor her to Juárez, Mexico: her home where she lives with her parents and two sisters, and the offices of El Diaro where she works as an editorial producer. Through her windshield she observes a convenience store, a bridge spanning some distance, and other vehicles, “going one way and another.”

“It’s not a very fun scene, but that’s kind of life,” she says.

Fernández was born and raised in Juárez,

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Locals say checkpoints along Mexico's southern border mean endless commutes and shake-downs

October 28, 2014

Credit: Jennifer Collins Zahit Salazar used to earn a little money selling clothes she bought near the southern border with Mexico. But Mexico’s new checkpoints have made that too difficult. She’s had to fall back on grinding corn to make tamales.

BY JENNIFER COLLINS

Zahit Salazar rises extra early on the days she goes to market.

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The Latest from our Migration Team

Jennifer Collins reports for PRI’s The World that new immigration check point along the Southern border of Mexico are costing locals their livelihoods. Listen HERE.

Salazar_GrindingCorn1Zahit Salazar rises extra early on the days she goes to market. It used to take the 78-year-old a few hours to get from her house in Mexico’s southern state of Chiapas to the market town near the border with Guatemala.

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